Andersons of Colonial N. Carolina

so I start this site in Virginia… go figure

Tracking The Traders…

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My interest in the Indian Traders stems from my quest to identify James Anderson who abruptly shows up in Occoneechee Neck, NC in 1716.  I’ve spent a not inconsiderable amount of time studying Patrick Anderson’s notes on the Colonial Virginia Andersons.   Try as I might, I am unable to link the NC James Anderson to the logical folks Patrick has chronicled, i.e., Reynard or Thomas Anderson.  Hence, I’ve attempted to build a case for the NC James being a son of George Anderson of Isle of Wight.

Consider:

There is no evidence to even guess at the age of James A of Occoneechee Neck. Since he bought the land and was married, it is assumable that he was born 1696 or earlier (first shows up 1716).  Also, since he sold out and “moved” in 1722/3?, there is nothing to substantiate that he died.  (see my “Page” for James of 1716 for details).  A puzzle piece to consider for this James is this mention by the authors Turner and Bridgers around 1905:

History of Edgecombe County, North Carolina

pg. 18   “The western part of Bertie Precinct increased rapidly in population, making progress both in civilization and importance. By 1723 there were twenty families on Tar River alone. Among the freeholders here in 1723 were James Thigpen, Thomas Elliott, Paul Palmer, James Anderson, Francis Branch, Samuel Spruill, James Long, Thomas Hawkins, William Burgis, William Arrenton. Some of these families still have representatives among the county’s citizens, while the counties of Halifax and Nash, when cut off, carried some of these settlers, and their descendants also live in those counties.”

I can’t imagine the authors would make this up… but they left no source for the observation leaving me to think there is more info on these people somewhere in the archives. And what more logical choice for this James of “Edgecombe” than the James of “Occoneechee”?

With that being said, I find genealogy and history interesting and like to share notes… the more I delve into the activities of the Indian Traders the more it leads me to tidbits of info that ties many of these colonial families together.  I say all this as a reason for future posts that you may think has nothing to do with ANDERSONS… I’m simply sticking a wet finger in the air looking for a direction to follow.

Reynard Anderson  b. abt. 1640 d. 1690, Charles City County, VA    http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~anderson/va/trees/reynard.html

Reynard Anderson

In Court 02/03/1689

Charles City County Court Orders 1687-1695, page 276

Judgt. granted Reynard Anderson as guardian to his four sons Matthew, Wm., John, and Henry Anderson, legatees of Tho. Symons, dec’d, agst Geo. Downing, Exec. of will of said Symons, for £ 10, which is given to said sons (50 s to each) by said will. Said Anderson to give good security.

Patrick further speculates that Reynard has an older son James who would have been “of age” and not in the above list of legatees… his plausible reason is this reference:

James Anderson

Matthew Anderson, Jr.   [think of “Jr” as “the younger”]

Prince George County Wills and Deeds 1710-1713, page 46.

Deed, 4 April 1711, William Ledbetter of Bristol Parish, Prin[c]e George Co. to Matthew Anderson, Jr., son of JAMES ANDERSON, Dec’d for 5 shillings, 49 acres in same parish; being part of 99 acres, the other 50 now in possession of Robert Munford, bounded by Matthew Mayse, John Mayse (formerly Henry Newcombe, dec’ds) Robert Munford’s land he bought of said Ledbetter and William Byrd’s land; with all houses, etc, for 3 years.

From the above, a prime candidate for the James A of “Occoneechee” is declared dead in a Primary Source Document.  All other James’ can be accounted for in VA.  The son of the VA James signs his name with the mark “O” which is different than the Occoneechee James (capital I with slash in middle).

To further follow Patrick’s leads:

children of Reynard Anderson

James Anderson “likely” married a daughter of James Thweatt

daughter Frances Anderson married (1) John Herbert, (2) Thomas Cocke, (3) Joshua Wynne

“a contract of marriage agreed upon between Capt. Josh. Wynne, Gent., of Prince George Co., and Frances Cocke, relict of Thomas Cocke, dec’d, and marriage is shortly to be solemnized.  Said Joshua and Frances appoint Robert Munford, John Anderson & William Anderson of Prince George Co. to be parties in trust in behalf of them, that said Frances, after her marriage, to enjoy all the estate she now hath, and to dispose of it as she sees fit.  Signed:  Joshua Wynne, Frances Cocke   Witn:  Peter Jones, Tho. Cocke   Rec. 10 Feb 1711

I, Joshua Wynne of Westopher Parish, Prince George Co. am bound to Robert Munford, John Anderson and William Anderson for £500.    16 Feb 1710.       To abide by above contract.   Signed:  Joshua Wynne Wit:  Peter Jones, Tho. Cocke   Rec. 13 Dec 1711”

John Anderson partnered with Robert Munford

Henry Anderson closely associated with William Byrd II

This Henry’s son John is who I think owned a plantation just south of Occoneechee Neck (see my “Page” re: Bridger’s Creek)

All of these folks were involved in the Indian Trade… others which interest me are:

John Sturdivant (worked for Byrd/killed while trading) and son Matthew (who is suspected of marrying an Anderson)

Richard Cureton (also suspected of marrying an Anderson/ moved to Occoneechee Neck)

So… if I make a post and start it with “TTT such and such”… I’m tracking a trader.    …see TTT Arthur Kavanaugh under “Pages” to the right…

 

 

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Written by anderson1951

March 26, 2011 at 10:25 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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