Andersons of Colonial N. Carolina

so I start this site in Virginia… go figure

Elizabeth Pitman Land 1761/2

with 18 comments

Edgecombe County
Elizabeth Pitman
300ac, Grant # 170, Mar 25, 1749
Book 11, p. 243
Beginning on the No. side of Tar River

The tan colored section of this map is from a 1903 USGS historical Topo map… the other is a modern Topo.  It shows my best guess for Mial’s Bridge and Sweetan’s Landing (the road referred to in the 1760s “road orders)  The men mentioned would have lived close enough to service the road.  I can not find any specific clues as to where Joseph Pitman and  Arthur Pitman were living in 1760… they were clearly in the area.

Deed book 0 page 347: “Elizabeth PITTMAN of Edgecombe County, to Joseph PITTMAN of same, planter, 21 Sep 1761, 200 acre plantation whereon she then lived… part of the tract granted to sd. Elizabeth by Earle Granville 25 May 1759.” (This date of 1759 is apparently a mistake…should be 1749.)
Edgecombe County Court Minutes Sept 1762
Deed of Sale from Elizabeth Pitman to Joseph Pitman proved by Aaron Coleman.

xxx

Edgecombe deed book 1 p 89 Edgecombe Co NC: Elizabeth PITTMAN of Edgecombe Co to Arthur PITMAN planter, 26 Sep 1761, 90 acres north side of Tar River…Granville grant to said Elizabeth…May 1749.
Edgecombe County Court Minutes Dec 1761-Mar 1762
Deed of Sale from Elizabeth Pitman to Arthur Pitman proved by Sherd. Haywood Esq.

xxx

xxx

DB 1, p. 381: 20 Sep 1762 ARTHUR PITMAN of Edgecombe Co., planter to JOSEPH PITMAN of same, planter, for £20 Proc. money a tract of 100 acres on the north side of Tar River adjoining ELIZ. PITMAN, John Fountain and Robert coleman. Wit: Wm. (X) Anderson, Handover (X) Hatcher, John Foundain.
Edgecombe County Court Minutes Sept 1762
A Deed of Sale from Arthur Pitman to Joseph Pitman proved by Wm. Anderson

a misc 1764 deed…

1764       20 Apr. Robert Armstrong of Edgecombe Co. to WILLIAM PITMON of same, for £5 Virginia money a tract of 60 acres on the north side of White oak Swamp on Tantroft Branch, it being taken out of Rite McLemore’s patent. Wit: JOSEPH PITMON, HANNAH (X) PITMON. DB C, p. 251

This is the last page of the 1775 deed from, to quote Bradley’s abstract, “Joseph Pitman & his wife Hannah (x) of Edgecombe Co to Thomas Teate of same. 1 Sep 1775. 25 pounds 10 shillings proclamation. 100 acres which was part of a grant to Elizabeth Pitman 25 Mar 1749, on the north side of Tar River & on Dochead [Doehead] Pocoson, joining Thomas Price. Sd femme relinquished right of dower. Wit: Michael Haywood, Sherwood Haywood. Oct Ct. 1775.” Not sure why Bradley put an “X” beside Hannah; clearly Joseph signed with an “X” while Hannah signed with an “H”. (notes of Traci Thompson)

Sheriff’s sale of Joseph Pitman dec’d to son Abner Pitman 1788
(reference is made on the second page to this being the former property of Elizabeth Pitman)

———————————————————
Notes…

The son of Thomas Pitman d.1730, Arthur, leaves an inventory near the area of Meherrin River in 1758… leaving the Arthur who bought the Elizabeth Pitman property in 1761 unexplained. The Meherrin Arthur leaves no will and his inventory is unremarkable with no clue as to possible children or a wife, if indeed he ever married. He is mentioned witnessing a few deeds with brother John Pitman and a will or two. The only other suspect Arthur I know of is the son of Ambrose Pitman.

Ambrose Pitman d. 1786 wife unknown
….. Lucy Haynes
….. Selah
….. Elisha
….. Elijah
….. Arthur
….. Phoebe Ralls
….. Ann Spier
….. Miller (daughter)
….. Zilpha
….. gson Willie
….. son John

The son of Ambrose Pitman was too young to be a player in the 1761 land sale of Elizabeth Pitman.  According to his 1832 RW pension application he was 83 yrs old making his birth about 1749.  He would be 12 yrs old or so…. additionally, an Arthur Pitman was noted in the 1750s Militia Rolls for Edgecombe- one had to be 16 to serve.

Another theory discussed in the comments by Traci is that the land may have been bought by the son or sons of the next door neighbor of Elizabeth Pitman. That would be James Pitman also with a wife named Elizabeth. He just disappears around 1746.

The Arthur Pitman below appears to move to Nash County (Saponey Creek area)… he seems to be associated with the William Pitman who married Judith Ross.

Edgecombe deed book 1 p 89 Edgecombe Co NC: Elizabeth PITTMAN of Edgecombe Co to Arthur PITMAN planter, 26 Sep 1761, 90 acres north side of Tar River…Granville grant to said Elizabeth…May 1749.

20 September 1762 ARTHUR PITMAN of Edgecombe Co., planter to JOSEPH PITMAN of same, planter, for £20 Proc. money a tract of 100 acres on the north side of Tar River adjoining ELIZ. PITMAN, John Fountain and Robert coleman. Wit: Wm. (X) Anderson, Handover (X) Hatcher, John Foundain. DB 1, p. 381.

1 November 1762 William (H) Henry of Edgecombe Co. planter, to ARTHUR PITMAN of same, planter, for 26/6/8 Proc. bills of N.C. a tract of 160 acres on the south side of Sapony Creek on the Great Branch adjoining Stephen Batcheler. Wit: David Pridgen, John (X) Basey, John Fountain. DB 1, p. 493.

20 January 1763 William (X) Hendrick of Edgecombe Co. to Eldread (Eldrick) Hendrick of same, for £10 Proc. money a tract of 120 acres on the south side of Sapony on the Old Place Branch, it being part of a tract of 556 accres granted to said William Hendrick by Earl Granville bearing date Sept 17, 1744. Wit: Thos. Carter, ARTHUR (a) PITTMAN. DB 1, p. 456.

7 January 1765 ARTER PITMAN to WM. PITMAN, £25 Virginia money a tract of land on the south side of Great Sapony Creek and on the Great Branch adjoining Stephen Batchelder. Wit: Thos. Harburt, Wm. Defnell. DB C, p. 434.

7 January 1765 ARTER (X) PITMAN of Edgecombe Co. to WILLIAM PITMAN of same, for £25 Virginia money a tract of 160 acres on the south side of Great Sapony Creek adjoining Stephen Batcheler. Wit: Thos Harbirt, William Defnall. DB 0, p. 147.

ABSTRACT OF WILLS, EDGECOMBE COUNTY, N.C., VOL. I, 1732-1792 by David B. Gammon, 1992, pp 36-37: John Hatcher, 1 Oct. 1765, Jan Ct. 1766, A/153 (Book A, p. 153). Will names son Jeremiah Hatcher, 100 acres at the mouth of the Dividing Branch adj. Hendricks Creek. Wife Dorothy – life estate in my remaining land with reversion to my daughter Sarah Hatcher. Daughter Mary – bed. Son John Hatcher – ten shillings. Wife – lend all moveable estate for her lifetime with reversion to my four children Hancock Hatcher, Jeremiah Hatcher, Sarah Hatcher and Mary Hatcher. To ARTHUR PITMAN – ten shillings. Ex. Hancock Hatcher. Wit: John Miall, Isom Pitman.

This Arthur appears to be a son in law or stepson of John Hatcher.  Hancock Hatcher apparently marries a Watkins and a group moves to Duplin County.

I found a mention in Adventures of Purse and Person, J.F. Dorman, pg. 285…  John Hatcher, son Hancock m. Margaret Watkins, 1763 (Edgecombe marriage bond)…  daughter (?) m. Arthur Pitman (no reference)

Duplin Co., NC, Deeds, Bk. 3, p. 281, as abstracted in Max R. Peterson, Jr., Abstracts

Sampson-Duplin Deeds Books 1-3 (c1750-c1774), p. 122:

Hancock Hatcher, blacksmith, sold to Jesse Wodkins for 10 pounds, 80 acres “on a branch called the Cabbin Branch making Out of the Beaver dam On the East side.” Deed mentions James Wodkins, Robert Bell, and William Bird. Land was “part of a small survey granted to Richard Ratliff by Patent Bearing date” 23 Apr 1762. Wit: Benjamin Bell and Thomas Wodkins.

Note: Hancock’s wife, Margaret, has been found in two different marriage sources as Margaret Watkins and Margaret Wilkins. Note that the above deed mentions Jesse Wodkins, probably Watkins. This could indicate that her name is most likely Watkins.     see here for more details…

http://hatcherfamilyassn.com/getperson.php?personID=I39022&tree=WmtheIm

Here is the proof…

John Watkins To Thomas Carr Deed 13 June 1782

(Transcribed by Joan S Dunn)

Deed Book 1 A Page 35, 36, 37, & 38

John Watkins To Thomas Carr

Deed of 140 acres of lands

State of No. Carolina Duplin County.  This indenture made this thirteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty two, between John Watkins of the County of New Hanover, planter of the one part and Thomas Carr of Duplin County planter of the other part, witnesseth that the said John Watkins for and in consideration of the sum of eighty seven and a half Spanish Mill’d dollars to him in hand paid by the said Thomas Carr at and before the ensealing nad delivery of the presents the receipt whereof he the said John Watkins doth hereby acknowledge and therefore hath granted bargainded sold alined released and eonfirmed and by these presents doth fully and absolutely grant bargain sell alien release and confirm unto the said Thomas Carr and his heirs & assigns forever a certain tract or parcer of land containing by extimation one hundred and forty acres be the same more or less situate lying and being on the West side of the Lin nension Duplin County being part of a tract of land containing four hundred and fifty acres granted (by patent bearing date the 22nd day of July 1774) to Arthur Pitman, which said one hundred and forty acres is butted and bounded as follows.  Begining at a red oak in Garin’s line and running up the said line to a pine, thence up the said line to Turkey Cock Branch, thence up said branch to a poplar thence along a new marked line to a Black Oak, thence along a new marked line to a post oak on the Short Branch 280 poles, thence down the said branch to Byrd Lanneare’s line cornering in a pine, thence up the said line to the corner, thence along Arthur Pitman’s line to the first station, and all houses woods orchard water courses inprovements and appurtenances thence unto belonging or in any wise appertaining and also the reversion and reversions remainder and remainders, rents & services of all and singular the above mentioned premises and also all deeds evidences and writings touching and eoncerning the said premises or any part or parcel thereof.  To have and to hold all and singular the said premises above mentioned and every part and parcel thereof with the appurtenances unto the said Thomas Carr his heirs and assigns the only proper use and behoof of the said Thomas Carr his heirs and assigns doth covenant and grant to and with the said Thomas Carr his heirs & assigns that he the said John Watkins now is the true lawful & rightful of all and sungular the premises above mentioned with the appurtenances & also that he the said John Watkins is lawfully and rightfully siezed in his own right of a good sure perfect absolute and undefeasable estate of inheritance in fee simple  of in and to the premises above mentioned with the appurtenances, whitout any manner of condition mortgage, or in any other matter cause or thing, to allow change or determine the same, and also that he the said John Watkins now hath good rightful power, and lawful authority, to sell and convey the prmises above mentioned, with the appurtenances, to the said Thomas Carr his heirs and assigns forever, according to the true intent and meaning of these presents, and also that he the said Thomas Carr his heirs or assigns shall and may at all times forever hereafter peaceably and quietly have hold occupy possess and enjoy all and singular the above bargained premises and appurtenances without troubel, hindrance, molestation internuption and denials of him the said John Watkins his heirs & assigns and of all and every other person or persons whatsoever and that free’s discharged and indermnifyed, from all former bargains, seals, gifts, grants jointures, mortgages, dowers, uses, wills, tittles troubles and incumbrances wharsoever made, done, committed or suffered by the said John Waktins or any other person or persons whatsoever claiming or to claim by from or under him them or any of them and also the said Jno. Watkins for himself his heirs and assigns doth further covenant and promise to and with the said Thomas Carr his heirs and assigns that he or they shall or will warrant and defend the above bargained land & premises against the claim or claims of all and every person or persons whatsoever and further that he the said John Watkins & his heirs and all and every other person or persons and his her or their heirs, any thing having or claiming in the said premises above mentioned or any part thereof, by from or under him, shall and will from time to time and at all times hereafter upon the reasonable request, and at the cost and charges of the said Thomas Carr his heirs or assigns make do or execute or cause or procure to be made done and executed, every such futher lawful & reasonable act & acts thing & things devise and devises conveyance and conveyances in the law whatsoever, for the further better and more perfect conveying and assuring of all and singular the premises, above bargained, with with the appurtenances to the said Thomas Carr his heirs & assighs to the only proler use and behoof of the said Thomas Carr his heirs & assigns forever as by the said Thomas Carr his heirs or assigns or hims her or their counsl. learned in the law may or shall be reasonably devised or advised or required.  In Witness whereof the said John Watkins hath hereunto set his hand and affixed his seal the day and year first above written.

John Watkins

Received the day and year above written of Thomas Carr eighty seven & an half Sph. Milld. dollars, being the full consideration money for the above bargained premises.

John Watkins

Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of us

W. Sharpless

Dempsey Pitman

State of North Carolina, Duplin County, July Court 1784.

There was the within deed proved in Open Court and ordered to be registered.

Test W. Dickson, C. C.

———————–

Update:

I found remnants of an estate file in Duplin County for one Arthur Pitman, 1814…

 

note the name “Batchelor” on this page…

source: familysearch.org, Estate Files, Duplin County

Since this Arthur is not the son of Ambrose and appears not to be a son of Thomas Pitman d1754 then that leaves open the possibility he was a son of Robert Pitman. Considering his early presence in the militia and his dealings with Joseph Pitman, I consider it likely.

Written by anderson1951

February 25, 2012 at 6:20 am

18 Responses

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  1. Wow, these scans look great on here! :)

    I am becoming more and more aware of a tie to this William Pitman. Do you have a page for this guy? I noticed he shows up (I think, if it’s the same William) in the militia roster along with Joseph and Arthur and William Anderson. I think this person could be a major player here.

    And now, I must share some great information with the group…or just Marc…whoever is listening.

    After pulling these deeds, I noticed a pattern that struck me as odd. As has been discussed, James Pitman was granted/bought three parcels of land in Edgecombe, and he apparently sells all three pieces: the Falling Run land to John Stallings, the Sapponey Creek land to William Ruffin, and the Green’s Ford land (that was part of a patent to Thomas Brown) to Nathaniel Bradford. But In 1749, one side of Elizabeth’s Granville grant is still described as being “in James Pitman’s [line.]” The 1760s deeds don’t mention James, but the 1788 sale to Abner still refers to a red oak “in James Pitman’s line.” It is not until the 1806 sale (not shown here) from Abner to William Stewart that the line is noted as “beginning at a red oak in a line formerly called Jas. Pitman’s…”

    Now, I know sometimes the deceased are still referred to in deeds even years after death, and sometimes boudaries are still referred to by past owners, and sometimes land granted is still described as it was in the original grant. But… for an entire century? If this was land he sold, seems like after a reasonable amount of time, it would be “Stallings line,” etc. Something about this strikes me as excessive. My thoughts of explanation were:

    1.) James was not dead at the time of some of these references.

    2.) James is dead, but he owned land not covered by the deeds.

    3.) He is dead, and an heir has inherited some of his land, but it is still being referred to by the father’s name.

    4.) This is land he sold, but he continued to live on it or rent it.

    Ponder that for awhile. More coming…

    Traci Thompson

    February 28, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    • Do you have an abstract cite for the James Stalling buy of the Pitman land? I have Thomas Price selling half of the “James Pitman land” in 1774 to his son. (I assume that Price bought the land from Stallings…Price was noted as adjacent landowner to the William Anderson grant of 1760).

      anderson1951

      February 28, 2012 at 5:05 pm

  2. After not being able to decide which of the above four scenarios was the most likely, I decided to consult with a colleague of mine, the wonderful and brilliant Ms. Kathy Gunter Sullivan, CG (Certified Genealogist; CG is a service mark of the Board for Certification of Genealogists.) Ms. Sullivan is particularly versed in the area of historical NC law, and she graciously shared her take on this situation (which I am sharing by permission.)

    First, her opinion is that #2 is a definite possibility. Although #4 is also possible. As she points out, “After all, he and Elizabeth would not leave themselves completely landless by choice…
    If Elizabeth Pittman had NO land when James Pittman died, then how did she sustain herself before acquiring the 1748/1760 land grant?”

    Also, I had thought about primogeniture, but was hung up on the lack of any sort of estate records for James. However, Ms. Sullivan reminded me that if James owned land and “if he died before 1749, then the law of primogeniture would kick in. That’s a possible reason that Elizabeth obtained her land grant; e.g. to provide land to younger sons. I agree with you that Elizabeth was either a widow or an unmarried woman because the grant is in her name.” And,”IF James Pittman owned land and died intestate then the land would pass silently to only one son–his eldest. There would be no evidence of deed transactions or inheritance; no necessity for those.” And, if that happened, the next logical thought would be, who was the oldest son?

    And more in a moment…

    Traci Thompson

    February 28, 2012 at 2:09 pm

  3. Here’s another interesting thought from Ms. Sullivan, one of those that makes me want to slap my head and say “duh” because I didn’t notice it.

    I pointed out the will of Elizabeth Anderson d. 1733, and Ms. Sullivan’s first comment was, who owned the mill?

    I said, what mill?

    And she pointed out: “I give to my Daughter Elisebeth Pitman, one paire of Small Mill Stones”

    For some reason, I had in mind something actually small. But, as Ms. Sullivan reminded me, mill stones of any variety tend to be pretty big. And heavy. She also pointed out that mill stones were a valuable commodity. And why would Elizabeth need them, unless she had some connection to a mill?

    Another thought to consider…I’ve also been hung up on William Anderson as an illegitimate child. But what if Elizabeth Pitman is actually a daughter in law, not a daughter? As in, married a son of Elizabeth Anderson, and then married a Pitman?

    A thousand thank yous to Ms. Sullivan for giving us lots of new ideas to chew on!! See her APG page here: http://www.apgen.org/directory/search_detail.html?mbr_id=2457

    Traci Thompson

    February 28, 2012 at 2:54 pm

    • Nice of Ms. Sullivan to chip in… I’ll bet she makes great footnotes… seriously. Good eye on that mill stone comment. I know some larger millstones can be 6 or 8 feet in diameter and weigh tons. I’ll probably lose sleep now fretting over where a mill could have been. Interesting also that William Anderson contemplated a mill on his Swift Creek/Falling Run property. (I’m not sure if it ever came to be). I just passed over the “mill stone” bit thinking they were a kitchen hearth variety and not the “industrial” version… even “small” could be 2 or 3′ in diameter I suppose. See! I’m fretting already.

      The “daughter in law” scenario fits more to my way of thinking… my main argument being that there was a perfectly good Elizabeth Pitman of “marryin’ age” living just across the river from Carolus Anderson. (daughter of Thomas Pitman d1730). I shall defend my shaky hypothesis until the cows freeze over … or perhaps the alternative “daughter out of law”… I know, I know I’m sounding like a broken record. I do have an open mind that she could be a blood Anderson who saddled up with a Pitman… there I said it.

      anderson1951

      February 28, 2012 at 3:29 pm

  4. I asked Ms. Sullivan how big she thought a “small mill stone” was, and her reply was “bigger than Elizabeth could lift,” LOL. For a visual, here’s one from somewhere along the Meherrin: http://www.flickr.com/photos/16611841@N00/314802503/

    Don’t fret, just pour yourself a big ole drink and get ready for the next stage of research! ;)

    Now then, about the James land…yes, I have an abstract…that’s the one that includes Elizabeth, although she is not named as his wife:

    21 February [1743?] – Edgecombe County deed, James and Elizabeth Pitman to John Stallings, 200 acres on the north side of Tar River, joining Falling Run. Witnessed by Robert Coleman, Jr. and recorded February Court 1743. Source: Margaret M. Hofmann, abstractor, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758 (Weldon, NC: Hofmann, 1976), p. 188, entry # “pg. 216.”

    Traci Thompson

    February 28, 2012 at 5:38 pm

  5. I suppose this is the Stallings/Price transaction?

    Again from Margaret M. Hofmann, abstractor, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758 (Weldon, NC: Hofmann, 1976), p. 55, entry # “pg. 169”:

    “John Stallins [Stallings] and Judith Stallins of Edge. Co. to Thomas Price of Edge.Co. planter 26 Jan. 1755 26 pounds current money of VA 200 acres more or less on the north side of Tar river and the north side of Falling run, joining the Great Pond as by patent 5 May 1742 Wit.: William Tayloe, John Woodard Reg. Edge. Co. Feb. Ct. 1755.”

    Traci Thompson

    February 28, 2012 at 5:45 pm

    • Duh…I have that Hofmann book too… thanks. Not sure of this source…

      Edge Co Db 2, Pg 106, Jan 31, 1774 Thomas (X) Price of Edge Co. to Cader Price of same, for 10pds Proc. Money the 100ac plantation whereon sd Cader Price then lived, situated on the north side of Tar River and northeast side of Falling Run, it being part of the land granted to James Pittman by patent bearing date May 5, 1742 Wit: Eth’d Philips, Exum Philips

      That leaves 100 acres unaccounted for…

      From Thomas Price will, 1779:
      “Wife ELIZABETH PRICE-lend half of my manor plantation and orchards where I now live, for her lifetime
      or widowhood. son ELIGE the manor plantaion where I now live with 100 Acres. ”

      No mention of James Pitman….

      Nice photo of the mill stone by the way… gotta love this blog format…

      anderson1951

      February 28, 2012 at 6:41 pm

  6. Just to make it clear, here’s the three acquisions of land and the three sales that are recorded for James:

    Grantee:

    5 May 1742 – Patent to James Pittman for 200 acres in Edgecombe County on the north side of Tar River and the north side of falling run, joining the side of a Great Pond, the run, and the river. Margaret M. Hofmann, abstractor, Colony of North Carolina, 1735-1764 Abstracts of Land Patents, Vol. 1 (Weldon, NC: Hofmann, 1982,) p. 166, entry # 2345.

    15 May 1742 – Patent to James Pitman for 200 acres in Edgecombe County on the south side of Sappony Creek [present-day Nash County], joining a point near the mouth of Flaggy Branch and the side of the swamp. Hofmann, Colony of North Carolina, 1735-1764 Abstracts of Land Patents, Vol. 1 , p. 241, entry # 3480.

    20 November 1744 – Thomas Brown and Mary his wife “of Edgecombe County” to James Pittman “of Edgecombe County” 100 acres “joining the river part of a patent dated 2 Mar. 1744 to Thomas Brown. Witnessed by John and William Sikes. Hofmann, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758, p. 197, entry # “pg. 309.”

    Grantor:

    21 February [1743?] – Edgecombe County deed, James and Elizabeth Pitman to John Stallings, 200 acres on the north side of Tar River, joining Falling Run. Witnessed by Robert Coleman, Jr. and recorded February Court 1743. Margaret M. Hofmann, abstractor, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758 (Weldon, NC: Hofmann, 1976), p. 188, entry # “pg. 216.”

    5 November 1745 – Edgecombe deed from James Pitman “of Edgecombe County” to William Ruffin “of Northampton County,” 200 acres on the south side of Sappony Creek near the mouth of Flaggy Branch. Hofmann, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758, p. 206, entry # “pg. 427.”

    11 February 1746 – Edgecombe County deed from James Pittman to Nathaniel Bradford, 100 acres “more or less” on the north side of Tar River at Green’s ford, joining a running branch and the river, “part of a grant to Thomas Brown for 200 acres 2 March 1744.”
    Hofmann, Abstracts of Deeds: Edgecombe Precinct, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, 1732 through 1758, p. 81, entry # “pg. 80.”

    Each piece of land is accounted for. However, as fabulous as Ms. Hofmann is, I do know for a fact that there are existing deeds that for some reason don’t appear in her books. It might be a good idea to double-check for land transactions for James, just in case.

    Traci Thompson

    February 29, 2012 at 9:54 am

  7. Now, that makes some sense! I had a feeling he might have relocated, but
    didn’t know where. Kudos to you! I feel much better now about writing off other Arthur as not the same guy. I wonder how far forward we could trace him…i see DNA possibilities…

    Not quite sure how you’re getting a step/inlaw relation between him and the Hatchers, though.

    traci thompson

    March 8, 2012 at 8:57 pm

    • I was just playing off a comment by a Hatcher researcher that the will of John Hatcher that mentions Arthur Pitman with 10 shillings lists daughters that appear to be underage… his hunch was that Arthur might be a stepson by the wife Dorothy (I think)… I haven’t even formed an opinion. My primary interest is where he came from which is still unanswered. … its a baby step.

      anderson1951

      March 9, 2012 at 3:27 am

  8. I noticed a few things…one, Handover Hatcher is a witness on the Arthur to Joseph deed. Secondly, Hancock Hatcher is noted in one of the deeds you posted as being a blacksmith. I’ve seen other researchers post online that Arthur was a blacksmith, but without a clear source. If this were true, it would make perfect sense; Arthur may have been apprenticed to the Hatchers, which would account for the suggested close relationship. And of course we know they were also neighbors. Here’s another thought…any evidence that Arthur might have been married to a Hatcher?

    I spent some time – rather unsuccessfully – trying to determine exactly where Mial’s bridge was on Swift Creek and where Sweetin’s Landing was on Tar River. The bridge was probably somewhere along where John and Norsworthy Mials lived. Ever platted those guys’ land? I did find a deed where a George Sweetin sold land to one of the Rosses, so the landing may have ended up on Ross property.

    traci thompson

    March 10, 2012 at 2:22 am

  9. I think I can plot Mial’s land… not sure about Sweetin,,, I’ll give it a shot.

    I looked for a will for Arthur in Duplin and didn’t find one (not saying it isn’t there of course)… no idea of his wife.

    Found some court notes that tie in…

    JANUARY, 1766:

    LWT of John HATCHER proved by John MYALS and Jesse PITMAN & Executors qualified. [who is this Jesse?]

    MAY, 1771:

    Rowland WILLIAMS overseer in room of David MANN

    Deed from William BRASWELL to Rowland WILLIAMS proved by Edward MOORE, Esq.

    Jury to lay off road from the road ending near William HORN into the road
    leading from Duncan LAMON’s crossing the Great Branch at or near the Sapponey
    Road: Daniel ROSS,
    John BATTLE, Josiah CRUDUP, Philip THOMAS, John FLOWERS,
    James RICKS, John RICKS, David BUNN, Benjamin BUNN, William HORN, Henry HORN,
    Jr., Isaac HORN, Samuel SKINNER, James JOLLEY, Jacob BARNES, Arthur VESTER,
    Benjamin O NEAL, Benjamin RICKS, and that William BARNS be overseer. Hands:
    William BARNES, Elijah REVELL, Micajah REVELL, Jacob BARNES, Jr., John PITMAN,
    Arthur O NEAL, David BUNN, Benjamin BUNN, Samuel SKINNER.

    AUGUST, 1771:
    Jury to lay off road near William HORNs the best and most convenient way into
    the road leading from LAMONs ferry at or near Benjamin DENSONs, to wit: William
    HORN, James RICKS, John RICKS, James JOLLEY, David BUNN, Arthur WHITLEY,
    Benjamin RICKS, John RICKS, Lewis RICKS, Samuel SKINNER, Benjamin O NEAL, Henry
    HORN, Jr., Isaac HORN, Thomas WILLIAMS, Nicholas SKINNER and John DAVENPORT, and
    that the following hands work on the same: Arthur WHITLEY, Benjamin BUNN, David
    BUNN, Arthur O NEAL, John PITMAN, Micajah REVELL, Jacob BARNES, Jr., Elijah
    REVELL, Samuel SKINNER and William BARNES and their hands, and that William
    BARNES be overseer thereof.

    MAY, 1772:
    Ordered that the following persons be a jury to lay off a road from the road
    near William HORNs, the best & most convenient way into the road leading from
    LAMONs Ferry at or near Benjamin DENSONs, to wit: William HORN, James RICKS,
    John RICKS, James JOLLEY, David BUNN, Arthur WHITLEY, Benjamin RICKS, John
    RICKS, Lewis RICKS, Samuel SKINNER, Benjamin O NEAL, Henry HORN, Jr., Isaac
    HORN, Thomas WILLIAMS, Nicholas SKINNER and John DAVENPORT, and that the
    following hands work on the same; to wit: Arthur WHITLEY, Benjamin BUNN, David
    BUN, Arthur O NEAL, John PITMAN, Micajah REVELL, Jacob BARNES, Elijah REVELL,
    Samuel SKINNER, and William BARNES and their hands & that William BARNES be
    overseer thereof.

    Gathering my thoughts… John Pitman near Three Creeks, VA 1740s… near Wright McLemore & White Oak Swamp 1760s… now near sappony Creek (Nash Co) 1772. Arthur Pitman moves to Duplin Co by 1774. All of this group seems to tie to the older William Pitman of VA (brother of Thomas d 1730)… the James of 1742-1746 could be included.

    anderson1951

    March 10, 2012 at 7:25 am

  10. I updated the map on this page… trying to stay in the 1760s… Mial’s property is shown. You focus on the “road orders” which helps to make sense of the different folks… good tip.

    anderson1951

    March 10, 2012 at 1:20 pm

  11. Thanks for adding Mial to the map…I’ll get the info on Sweetin & you can add him too.

    traci thompson

    March 10, 2012 at 10:37 pm

  12. Great update! Where you have placed them makes sense. Arthur & Joseph were somewhere along this road…of course you know I think they were in Elizabeth’s house.

    traci thompson

    March 12, 2012 at 7:46 pm

  13. With the Arthur estate papers…notice the woodworking tools on the first page, particularly “Copers ads” (probably “coopers adze.”) For a visual see: http://www.mainememory.net/artifact/14586

    Traci Thompson

    October 17, 2012 at 8:33 am

    • Good eye! That leaves little doubt as to his profession… unless he was just “seriously” into a woodworking hobby. :)

      anderson1951

      October 17, 2012 at 9:12 am


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